Sustainable Hospitals
 
Mercury Reduction
Examples of Mercury Purchasing Language
 
Source: Sustainable Hospitals Project
 

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Mercury Free Resolution and Purchasing Policy
SOURCE:Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center
 
DHMC endorsed a resolution to be a "mercury free" facility. (See below). The resolution states:
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that DHMC should discontinue the purchase of new mercury containing equipment where other non-hazardous alternatives are available such as aneroid sphygmomanometers and non-mercury thermometers, and that existing mercury devices should be replaced with non-hazardous devices whenever possible, and strongly encourages the elimination or reduction of mercury and mercury compounds in any process or procedure performed at DHMC.
 
 
In support of this resolution, DHMC has adopted the following purchasing policy:
  1. DHMC will inform manufacturers, vendors, and group purchasing organizations (GPOs) of its non-mercury purchasing policy, and will encourage them to identify and label products containing mercury, and to offer non-mercury alternative products whenever feasible alternatives exist that do not compromise patient care.

  2.  
  3. Supplier shall represent and warrant in the purchase agreement and with the submission of this Policy that the products proposed to be furnished under any purchase agreement do not contain mercury.

  4.  
  5. If the products proposed do contain mercury, it must be identified and listed in an exhibit to this Policy. Supplier shall specify the amount of mercury contained in any products listed in this exhibit and indicate if a feasible mercury-free alternative is available.

 
 
A Resolution in Support of a Mercury Free Initiative
Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center

 
WHEREAS elemental mercury and mercury compounds are known to be hazardous to human health and the environment and are a potential source of exposure to patients, visitors and staff, and
 
WHEREAS the DHMC Hazard Communication Policy and the "List Of Highly Restricted Hazardous Materials" requires consideration of less hazardous alternatives, and
 
WHEREAS DHMC has experienced 69 mercury spills since 1994 resulting in a cost of $25,800 for cleanup, labor and disposal costs, and
 
WHEREAS mercury continues to be a dangerous and persistent pollutant recognized as a bio-accumulative toxin and is largely responsible for federal advisories against the consumption of fish, and
 
WHEREAS DHMC is participating in the "AHA/EPA Memorandum of Understanding" process to eliminate mercury from health care, and
 
WHEREAS EPA New England is encouraging hospitals in the region to participate in the "Mercury Challenge Program" to find alternatives to using mercury in health care equipment and products, and
 
WHEREAS the state of New Hampshire "Mercury Reduction Strategy" report identifies the health care industry as a major source of mercury pollution, and
 
WHEREAS the DHMC Statement of Environmental Principles confirms DHMC's commitment to improving environmental management throughout the organization, and that DHMC will manage, minimize and eliminate, whenever possible, the use of hazardous materials, and
 
WHEREAS DHMC continues to be committed to the health and welfare of the people and communities we serve and the environment we all share, and
 
WHEREAS there are recognized and widely accepted alternatives to mercury and mercury containing devices in health care.
 
NOW THEREFORE LET IT BE RESOLVED that the Environmental Resources Committee and the Safety Committee hereby supports, endorses and commends all efforts consistent with institutional goals and financial considerations to eliminate and/or reduce mercury use at DHMC.
 
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that DHMC should discontinue the purchase of new mercury containing equipment where other non-hazardous alternatives are available such as aneroid sphygmomanometers and non-mercury thermometers, and that existing mercury devices should be replaced with non-hazardous devices whenever possible, and strongly encourages the elimination or reduction of mercury and mercury compounds in any process or procedure performed at DHMC.
 
 
____________________________
_______________
Chairperson, ERC
____________________________
_______________
Chairperson, Safety Committee
 
 
 
Mercury Reduction
SOURCE: Kaiser Permanente
 
Kaiser Permanente is committed to minimizing the amount of mercury utilized in its operations, and desires to avoid the acquisition of products that contain mercury whenever feasible alternatives exist that do not compromise patient care.
 
Supplier shall represent and warrant in the purchase agreement and with the submission of this Proposal that the products proposed to be furnished under any Agreement do not contain mercury, except as identified and listed in an exhibit to this Proposal. Supplier shall specify the amount of mercury contained in any products listed in this exhibit and indicate in the Proposal if a feasible mercury-free alternative is available.
 
 
 
Purchasing Procedure Mercury Abatement Policy
Source: Butterworth Hospital
 
The Purchasing Department will make every attempt to not purchase any product that contains mercury. This list of products includes, but is not limited to, sphygmomanometers, diffusion pumps, esophageal, and mercury electrodes.
 
The Purchasing staff will work with the requisitioning department to find alternate products to acquire in place of the products that contains mercury. For example, Disposable thermometers will be replaced by digital thermometers or disposable temperature strips. Mercury filled sphygmomanometers will be replaced with digital sphygmomanometers.
 
The environmental Services Director will be notified if the mercury containing product has to be purchased because there is no substitute product available.
 

 
Mercury Reduction
 
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